A Father’s Song “No Tears” by Rick Wallace

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I have posted this in Honor of the Sacrifices of:

Sgt. Brandon Wallace, who made the ultimate sacrifice; the special Gold Star families; my brother-in-law, Hugh Vertrees (U. S. Army, Viet Nam) & to all Viet Nam vets to whom I say, Welcome Home soldiers Thank you for your service; my courageous nephew, Richard Vertrees (Baghdad, Iraq, Army Military Police) & all our troops currently serving; my father, Dave Wilson (U.S. Navy-Guam; Air Borne, Early Warning Squadron One, Hawaii); Corporal J. D. Meadors (U.S. Army); my husband’s father, Norman Davis, Sr. (U.S. Air Force-Germany); my dear friends, James O’Leary (U.S.N., Purple Heart Recipient, Beirut) & Larry Henderson (U.S. Army); my dear uncle, J. N. Wright (U.S. Air Force-England); Thomas Clifford “Cliff” Bland, Jr., Captain (U.S. Air Force, Gulf War hero who made the ultimate sacrifice.) & Cliff’s father, Tom Bland, who is, and always will be, dear to my heart; John M. “Jack” Morgan (Gulf War hero who made the ultimate sacrifice) & Jack’s very special mother; the compassionate and dedicated Kiowa War Mothers & the warriors they’ve served – both past and present who hold a special place in my heart; the courageous World War II Code Talkers such as Woogie Watchetaker’s brother, Comanche Code Talker, Charles Chibitty (who, at the time of his passing, was the last of the Comanche Code Talkers); & all warriors of freedom who are currently serving or have previously served our nation in peace-time and war-time, along with their families & friends who have also personally sacrificed much for the honor & protection of our nation and its people.

Click on Music Player link below to hear “No Tears”:
music player at MyFlashFetish.com

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Beginning of Post from: http://www.rickandlisawallace.com

ABOUT THEM: On April 14, 2007, Sgt. Brandon Wallace was killed in Fallujah, Iraq when a road-side bomb detinated near his humvee. While searching for a way to bring comfort and healing to those that knew him, miss him and loved him, on October 3rd, 2007, inspiration struck. “No Tears” came about in a moment of divine inspiration. It started with a couple of phrases penned on an envelope and quickly escalated into melody and lyrics that we believe will bring comfort, healing, and hope to the listener.

In that same week, Brandon’s uncle, Randall Wallace, while at work, wrote the words to “Always Felt Your Love”. These words, he felt, was inspired also, and soon turned into melody and song. We believe that this song also will bring comfort, healing, and hope to the listener.

The song “Hold On” was written by Rick Wallace for his son, Sgt. Brandon Wallace while he was still serving in Iraq. Although Brandon never got the chance to hear it, we believe these words will bring encouragement to other men and women all over the world.

This CD is in honor of “OUR HEROSgt. Brandon Wallace
In memory of all Fallen Heroes around the world
Dedicated to all Gold Star families & those still serving in Uniform

Posted @ http://www.rickandlisawallace.com on: 4-14-07
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Sgt. Brandon Wallace

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Brandon’s Great Grandfather – WWI

No Tears
I was watching from a window in Heaven
You seemed so close yet so far
I could see teardrops falling that you shed for me
I saw you crying, calling out my name
I wanted to hold you, tell you I’m OK
No tears will fall in Heaven
Teardrops aren’t welcome up here
No tears will fall in Heaven
There’s no sorrow, there’s no pain
God wiped my tears away
I was walking down the streets of Heaven
I was singing with the angels round the crystal sea
I was dancing on streets of gold when your memory came to me
I wanted to tell you, though you couldn’t see
All the shakels are broken now and I am free.

Lyrics-Rick and Lisa Wallace
ASCAP All rights reserved
2007

Brandon, with his sisters Rachel (left) and Sarah
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Always Felt Your Love

From the cradle to my first memory
When you felt my first hug
When I sat up on your knee
When you said “no”
And I said “why”
You said “just because”
Through the years, smiles, and tears
I always felt your love

I always felt your love
It helped me rise above
In troubled lands across the sea
Your love carried me Above
I always knew I never walked alone
Through dangers, snares, and trials
I knew this world was not my home
I shed that earthly vessel
That lies beneath that chiseled stone
Now this glorified new body
Dances round my Saviour’s throne.

Lyrics-Randall Wallace
ASCAP All rights reserved
2007

Sgt. Brandon Wallace

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Hold On

Hold on Just hold on
Be strong Just be strong
Hold on Just hold on
Be strong Just be strong
Hold on though the waves rage high
He will be your anchor
He will calm the storms of life
Be strong, though you’re growing weak
He is your strong tower He will be your strength
Hold on Just hold on
Be strong Just be strong
Hold on Just hold on
Be strong Just be strong
They may throw you in the fire
And bring you fear and doubt
He was the fourth man in the furnace
I know that he will bring you out
He is the Lion of Judah
See the battle is not yours
So shout with a voice of triumph
Come on and shout unto the Lord.

Lyrics-Rick Wallace
ASCAP All rights reserved
2007

TalkingWithHeroes.com – Rick wrote a song in memory of his son, Sgt. Brandon Wallace who died in the Middle East (April 14, 2007) called “No Tears”. Rick and Lisa have written two… http://talkingwithheroes.com/product _info.php?cPath=47&products_id=364

“NO TEARS” IS AVAILABLE AT THE FOLLOWING LOCATION
Parable Christian Store
1716 Missouri State Road, Arnold MO 63010
636-287-1231

END of POST @:http://www.rickandlisawallace.com

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“What a beautiful tribute to your son, Rick & Lisa.
May God bless & keep you all. And may the blessings
you have sent out to others come back to you 10-fold.

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I will be posting more about Comanche Code Talker, Charles Chibitty
(brother of my dear friend, George Woogie Watchetaker).
I will also be writing more about the Kiowa War Mothers.
Please check back!

Vision of Victory… My Tribute By Cheryl Davis
Vision of Victory… My Tribute
by Cheryl Davis © 1991

https://www.cheryldavisnativeamericanart.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=22&products_id=75

Some Gave All – All Gave Some

In Honor they came, In Honor They Gave

In Valor, For Purity, For Justice.

Our Hero’s of Desert Storm

To every life, my life is true until victory. Until there is no enemy…
Only Peace.
Written by Cheryl Davis © 1991

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“Greater love hath no man than this,
that he would lay down his life for another

John 15:13

Published in: on November 14, 2007 at 8:34 pm  Comments (4)  

Bridge To No Where!

I will be writing more along the subject of the Kiowa War Mothers, the WWII Code Talkers, my trips to Normandy, France and Luxembourg. Because of the impact these things have had on me, the recent issue of the bridge players’ making a political statement at an international non-political event caught my attention. I have a major problem with those who speak ill of our nation on foreign soil (which includes their written comment against the “Office of the Presidency”). On one of my trips to France, several artists were interviewed by a French reporter in Renne. It was an eye-opening experience. One I will never forget. We had just visited Normandy, the sacred “American” ground where so many gave their lives so the French could live in freedom (FYI: the French gave us this land to bury our fallen warriors. We hire them to cut the grass. American troops paid for that land with their blood and we pay to maintain it.). I had viewed the markers… endless rows of heroes (so many just boys) who never came home. They were someone’s son, daughter, husband, wife, father, mother, brother, sister, uncle, aunt, cousin, niece, nephew, grandparent or friend. I have since revisited Normandy two additional times, and have also visited the American Cemetery in Luxembourg where all the fallen warriors are buried facing their commander, Gen. George Patton. Because of the sacrifices of so many, I find the bridge players’ act heartbreaking. Say what you wish here at home. That is what our heroes lay their lives on the line for. Regardless of your views on the war, our government & its’ leaders… degrading the Office of the Presidency (regardless of who is in that position), or degrading our military… or degrading our country in general “ON FOREIGN SOIL” is a reckless & disrespectful act. Without the Freedom of Speech, I would not be able to have this Art Blog. I respect any citizen’s right to speak out and voice their opinions on any issue. Say what you want on American soil, BUT please don’t say it on foreign soil, in public or to foreign press. It is cowardice to take one’s political views overseas as opposed to speaking out at home.  It is a disgraceful act in my opinion… considering the enormous price that has been paid for our freedom. I don’t want to use my art blog as a political soapbox. But when I saw this in the news, I had to post an opinion on this issue. This is not about their political views. I do not care what their views are. If they had made that statement upon their return from Shanghai, that would have been their right to do so. The problem I have with what they did? It was not the time or place for them to make ANY political statements. The contract they signed forbid it. They were there on someone else’s nickle. My big issue with what they did was that if they wanted to make a political statement, they should have made it at home. Save your negative comments for when you are standing onour soil please! Negative comments have a far greater effect when made overseas and the extent of the damage it does, we may never know. Why would anyone want to contribute “to any degree” to the possible demise of their own country? You have to ask yourself for what purpose was their statement made. They said they wanted these foreigners (who most likely could care less about them or us…) to know that they sympathized with them in some way for all the things America has done or is now doing… (something along those lines). So, they plead, “Like me, please, please…even though I am American?”  What benefit would it be to have Shanghai’s “stamp of approval” on our politics in that setting?” I thought it was “about bridge” – NOT POLITICS. Who appointed these ladies to represent us as a country politically? Who asked them to apologize for anything? They do not represent me!  Such an act dishonors our people who have laid down their lives for us our troops, veterans “like our code-talkers,”  …all our fallen heroes.   Does it not desecrate the honor of our brave warriors?  These ladies were representing the Federation and the Federation is not a political organization. They signed an agreement with the Federation which outlined the guidelines and by signing it, agreed to comply with those guidelines. The actions of Jill Levin, Jill Meyers, Debbie Rosenberg & Irina Levitina of the Venice Cup championship team were extremely inappropriate and shameful, in my opinion.

PLEASE, if you don’t like this country or appreciate the abundant blessings we have here… there is a simple solution… you are free to move elsewhere (that’s free, as in freedom, bought with the blood of our troops)!  Hey, pick a country. I will commit to pay for the one-way ticket (…when you send me your passport, so you can’t come back after you realize your mistake & become homesick).  I know our country and its people are far from perfect.  Please show me a perfect country or government.  But if you don’t like something… work to change it. Speak out AT HOME! Vote who you don’t like out of office, go protest, petition or better yet, quit playing cards and run for office yourself!   But let’s please keep it IN-HOUSEladies, ok?

Below is source of article and article on the bridge players in question, accused of treason and sedition:
Progressive News Daily
By e-mail, angry bridge players have accused the women of “treason” and “sedition.”
Technorati Tags: anti-Bush statement, world bridge championships,
progressivenewsdaily.com/

Anti-Bush Sign Has Bridge World in an Uproar

L to R: Jill Levin, Jill Meyers, Debbie Rosenberg & Irina Levitina of the Venice Cup championship team in Shanghai – By STEPHANIE STROM – Published: November 14, 2007

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/14/arts/14brid.html?_r=1&8dpc&oref=slogin

In the genteel world of bridge, disputes are usually handled quietly and rarely involve issues of national policy. But in a fight reminiscent of the brouhaha over an anti-Bush statement by Natalie Maines of the Dixie Chicks in 2003, a team of women who represented the United States at the world bridge championships in Shanghai last month is facing sanctions, including a yearlong ban from competition, for a spur-of-the-moment protest.

At issue is a crudely lettered sign, scribbled on the back of a menu, that was held up at an awards dinner and read, “We did not vote for Bush.”

By e-mail, angry bridge players have accused the women of “treason” and “sedition.”

“This isn’t a free-speech issue,” said Jan Martel, president of the United States Bridge Federation, the nonprofit group that selects teams for international tournaments. “There isn’t any question that private organizations can control the speech of people who represent them.”

Not so, said Danny Kleinman, a professional bridge player, teacher and columnist. “If the U.S.B.F. wants to impose conditions of membership that involve curtailment of free speech, then it cannot claim to represent our country in international competition,” he said by e-mail.

Ms. Martel said the action by the team, which had won the Venice Cup, the women’s title, at the Shanghai event, could cost the federation corporate sponsors. The players have been stunned by the reaction to what they saw as a spontaneous gesture, “a moment of levity,” said Gail Greenberg, the team’s nonplaying captain and winner of 11 world championships.

“What we were trying to say, not to Americans but to our friends from other countries, was that we understand that they are questioning and critical of what our country is doing these days, and we want you to know that we, too, are critical,” Ms. Greenberg said, stressing that she was speaking for herself and not her six teammates. The controversy has gone global, with the French team offering support for its American counterparts.

“By trying to address these issues in a nonviolent, nonthreatening and lighthearted manner,” the French team wrote in by e-mail to the federation’s board and others, “you were doing only what women of the world have always tried to do when opposing the folly of men who have lost their perspective of reality.” The proposed sanctions would hurt the team’s playing members financially. “I earn my living from bridge, and a substantial part of that from being hired to compete in high-level competitions,” Debbie Rosenberg, a team member, said. “So being barred would directly affect much of my ability to earn a living.”

A hearing is scheduled this month in San Francisco, where thousands of players will be gathered for the Fall North American Bridge Championships. It will determine whether displaying the sign constitutes conduct unbecoming a federation member.

Three players— Hansa Narasimhan, JoAnna Stansby and Jill Meyers — have expressed regret that the action offended some people. The federation has proposed a settlement to Ms. Greenberg and the three other players, Jill Levin, Irina Levitina and Ms. Rosenberg, who have not made any mollifying statements.

It calls for a one-year suspension from federation events, including the World Bridge Olympiad next year in Beijing; a one-year probation after that suspension; 200 hours of community service “that furthers the interests of organized bridge”; and an apology drafted by the federation’s lawyer. It would also require them to write a statement telling “who broached the idea of displaying the sign, when the idea was adopted, etc.”

Alan Falk, a lawyer for the federation, wrote the four team members on Nov. 6, “I am instructed to press for greater sanction against anyone who rejects this compromise offer.” Ms. Greenberg said she decided to put up the sign in response to questions from players from other countries about American interrogation techniques, the war in Iraq and other foreign policy issues. “There was a lot of anti-Bush feeling, questioning of our Iraq policy and about torture,” Ms. Greenberg said. “I can’t tell you it was an overwhelming amount, but there were several specific comments, and there wasn’t the same warmth you usually feel at these events.” Ms. Rosenberg said the team members intended the sign as a personal statement that demonstrated American values and noted that it was held up at the same time some team members were singing along to “The Star-Spangled Banner” and waving small American flags. (…that is supposed to make it OK? GEEZ! What a weak person she revealed herself to be.)

“Freedom to express dissent against our leaders has traditionally been a core American value,” she wrote by e-mail. “Unfortunately, the Bush brand of patriotism, where criticizing Bush means you are a traitor, seems to have penetrated a significant minority of U.S. bridge players.” Through a spokesman, the other team members declined to discuss the matter. Ms. Narasimhan, Ms. Stansby and Ms. Meyers have been offered a different settlement agreement, but Ms. Martel declined to discuss it in detail.

Many of those offended by the sign do not consider the expressions of regret sufficient. “I think an apology is kind of specious,” said Jim Kirkham, who has played in several bridge championships. “It’s not that I don’t forgive them, but I still think they should be punished.” Mr. Kirkham sits on the board of the American Contract Bridge League, which accounts for a substantial portion of the federation’s financing, Ms. Martel said, and has submitted a proposal that would cut the league’s support for the federation, one of two such proposals pending.

Robert S. Wolff, one of the country’s pre-eminent bridge players, who has served as an executive and board member of several bridge organizations, said that he understood that the women might have had a legal right to do what they did but that they had offended many people. “While I believe in the right to free speech, to me that doesn’t give anyone the right to criticize one’s leader at a foreign venue (the KEY to the whole outrage…) in a totally nonpolitical event,” he wrote by e-mail.

David L. Anderson, a bridge player who supports the team, said it was common to see players at international tournaments sporting buttons bearing the date “1-20-09,” when George W. Bush will hand off to a new president, as well as buttons reading “Support Our Troops.” “They don’t go after those people,” Mr. Anderson said.

END OF ARTICLE

Published in: on November 14, 2007 at 8:32 pm  Comments (2)