Doc Tate Nevaquaya’s 1st print?

I thought you might be interested to see what has been said to be the first print Doc ever produced. It was made around 1978.

The title of the work is “Sand Storm.”

doc_first-print

Very interesting piece, don’t you think?

Published in: on February 27, 2009 at 6:54 am  Leave a Comment  

Woogie: Comanche Warrior

Woogie

This is a beautiful photo portrait of my dear friend, Woogie Watchetaker, graciously provided by David and Ruth Malhalab.  It was taken by their family member, Jonathon J. Malhalab, sometime between 1976 – 1977 when the family member was stationed at Fort Sill.

Mr. Malhalab is seeking any information whatsoever relating to this photo and the circumstances relating to it.  If you have  any information relating to this photo or the events relating to it, please email me and I will put you in contact with him.

In the meantime, I hope you enjoy seeing Woogie, proudly displaying his great strength, pride and strong character. What a special man he was and I extend a special thank you to Mr. Malhalab for sharing it with me and for the permission to post it on my artblog so that the entire world can enjoy it as well. Jonathon J. Malhalab’s photographic skills were amazing.  I know Woogie must have been very pleased with the  results of the sitting.  I’m so thankful for whatever circumstances made it possible for the photo to be taken and appreciate David Malhalab generously sharing it with us.  This, my friends, is the Woogie I knew.  He always described himself to me as “strong, like Geronimo” and that strength Woogie always displayed was skillfully captured in this photo.

NOTE:  This photo is protected by a copyright.  You must have written permission from Mr. Malhalab or his representative to copy or use this photo.

Four Gifted Sons: Doc’s Legacy Lives On…

Cheryl writes: “No finer people were there than the likes of Doc and Charlotte. And I say the same for their sons, featured in this great article below, published May 5, 2001. Doc’s sons carry the gifts of their father – each with their own unique styles and interests – each carving out their own place. But their father and mother’s influences are apparent in all that they do. I have a special place in my heart for Tim and his family, as we have gotten to know each other at different events through the years. Their kindness and friendship has been something I place great value on. And what a fine man Tim is – he has his father’s gentleness and his talent continues to amaze me, as does the talent of all the brothers. I’ve also had the pleasure of doing past events with Sonny and getting to know him. I just cannot say enough good things about this family. If one could bottle up all the talent that this family has been blessed with, there would not be enough warehouses in the universe to store it all.” (Below: Doc, working on one of his masterfully-made flutes in his workshop.)

www.okhistory.org

Cheryl states,”It has been a blessing and great honor to be acquainted with this fine and talented family.”

Peyote Singer by Tim Nevaquaya

Canku Ota (Many Paths)

http://turtletrack.org/Issues01/Co05052001/CO_05052001_Brothers.htm

An Online Newsletter Celebrating Native America

May 5, 2001 – Issue 35

Four brothers raised in Apache, Ok. are following in their father’s footsteps — and emerging from his shadow.

Above: Calvert Nevaquaya displays some of his three-dimensional art in March 2001 in Apache, Okla.

Each of the sons of the late Doc Tate Nevaquaya, renowned Native American artist and flutist, has traveled the broad trail their father pioneered.

The journey began in the 1950s as they were exposed on a daily basis, to his paintings depicting Indian history and music he played on the flutes he carved.

Each of the brothers — Tim, Lean ‘Sonny’, Edmond and Calvert — has chosen a path down the trail cleared for them 50 years ago.

With their own unique talents in oil paintings, watercolors, acrylics and flute carving, they’re still developing their places in the art world which is slowing drawing them out of their father’s silhouette.

“All of our children grew up surrounded by their dad’s paintings. They sat down at the dinner table and they looked at his work,” recalled their mother Charlotte Nevaquaya.

Crystal Gayle with two of Doc’s sons at the Native American Music Awards

“Doc knew all the Native American stories from the 1800s and he painted them their entire lives. There was no way they couldn’t have been influenced by the stories he told them.”

Tim was the first of the Nevaquaya brothers to set off on the art trail.

“When I was 3, in 1969, I remember seeing a television announcing the astronauts had walked on the moon,” said Tim. “I ran to my room and grabbed a pencil and paper and never stopped drawing.”

Tim recalled how painting came to him through a nightly ritual with Doc Tate.

“When my father painted in his studio, I would fall asleep at his feet watching him,” Tim said. “He would tell me stories as he painted free people, beautiful sunsets, land and horses.”

In the beginning, at age 13, Tim received his first oil set — he’s the only one of the four brothers who use oils — from his father and painted several items with him, Doc Tate painted people and Tim painted sunsets.

“My father was my teacher, I was his apprentice with flutes and silhouettes,” said Tim. “He taught me that the only way to do a silhouette is to explore it and advance it. This is something I will carry with me throughout my art career.”

Later, he developed his own talent for making his paintings come to life.

“I’d put on tapes of Indian music and I would become the dancer and flute player I was painting. At other times, I became the warrior,” Tim explained.

“This is what came out on my canvas.”

In other art his favorite subject — thunderstorms.

“If he could be a storm-chaser, he would,” said his wife Sandra. “He’ll say to me, ‘let’s go and see the sunset or follow that storm.’ He thinks thunderstorms are beautiful. He creates a beautiful painting depicting it after he sees it.”

Tim’s flute making also is inspired by his father.

“When I make my flutes I use cedar because it gets you fired up. You see designs form in the wood. I can’t go to sleep because I’m thinking about it,” Tim said.

Like his brother Tim, Edmond also began art at 13 but started at the opposite end of the trail from Tim. He was playing the flute with his father long before he started painting with watercolors in 1995.

Edmond didn’t paint with his father; rather he asked his father to critique his work after it was completed and before he sold it.

“I’d see my dad with my piece and I was amazed at how he’d grab a rush and go along and add one small touch and it would make a difference in the world,” said Edmond.

Edmond realized that his father knew best.

“I decided early on that the best thing I could do was follow in the footsteps of the path my father had already paved for me,” Edmond said. “Even today I get stuck on an idea and I look at photos of my dad and his prints and they always inspire me to go on.”

Calvert, the youngest of the brothers didn’t being his journey down the trail until after Doc Tate’s death. “I never sat with Dad or had his assistance with my art. I just learned from his work. He had movement and motion in his art,” Calvert said.

Though Doc Tate is known for a traditional flat base style, Calvert is trying a three-dimensional style.

“My art is detail-oriented and my colors are different than what dad would have done,” Calvert said. “I want people to recognize me as Calvert Nevaquaya when they think of my art, not as Doc Tate’s son. I’m proud of my dad, but I want to prove myself based on my talent, not his.”

Sonny, the oldest of the four sons, lives in Hollywood, Florida. He painted in the 70’s, but his primary focus today is flute music.

“I was always astonished with my father’s music. It magnetized me to him. All the sudden I’d hear his music and it did something to me,” Sonny said.

“Whenever I speak about music, I always tell people that if it weren’t for my father I wouldn’t be where I was,” Sonny said. “I carry this with me wherever I go.”

“Whenever I speak about music, I always tell people that if it weren’t for my father I wouldn’t be where I was,” Sonny said. “I carry this with me wherever I go.”

” Comanche Buffalo “ 18″ x 24″ oil on canvas

” Dance With The Wind “ 28″ X 22″ oil on canvas

Tim Nevaquaya is a full-blood Comanche Indian living in southwest Oklahoma. Tim’s art provides you with a visual opportunity to experience the uniqueness of his Native environment and painting style – ethereal and spiritual with inherently traditional imagery.

Michael McCormick Gallery
art spacer
106C Paseo del Pueblo Norte
Taos, New Mexico 87571
(800) 279-0879 – (575) 758-1372

asm2002 SPIRIT OF THE FLUTE – Lean “Sonny” Nevaquaya

Textural Native American flute music from the eldest son of the late Commanche artist and musician Doc Tate Nevaquaya. Lean’s handcrafted traditional instruments and evocative melodies fill vast reverberant spaces with power and grace as he infuses every note with an honest, contemplative quality.

Order asm2002CD from amazon.com

Native American Tube: Tim Nevequaya

Mar 31, 2008 Video: Tim Nevaquaya, comanche musician, flute maker, and artist from Oklahoma. Popular: nation TIm flute Nevaquaya artist comanche
natube.magnify.net/item/J9XW9M0ZT4TF9K9J – 72k – CachedSimilar pages

Sonny Nevaquaya – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sonny Nevaquaya is a Comanche Native American flute player and maker from Oklahoma. He began his professional career in 1993 when he recorded an album
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonny_Nevaquaya – 17k

INAFA Merchandise

Sonny Nevaquaya states the following about the video: ”I’m very honored to be asked to do this video. In the late ’50s my father, Doc Tate Nevaquaya,
worldflutes.org/merchandise.htm – 25k

Flute Players

Sonny Nevaquaya brings the art and spirit of Native American Flute playing to a new level. Peaceful, Inspirational images fill the air in the presence of
http://www.geocities.com/wagnuka/playerswav.htm – 13k
Published in: on July 11, 2008 at 6:40 pm  Comments (1)  

The Creator blesses me today…

The mountains circle their arms around me here.

The meadow provides a calm place through which a stream composes music.

The Creator blesses me today with a world that nourishes me.

I am thankful for the blessings.

Published in: on June 26, 2007 at 9:24 pm  Leave a Comment  

Photo of me with Doc at one of our calendar signings or shows

me_doc.jpg

Doc was such a nice man. A pleasure to be around and always had many wonderful stories to share. Doc would play his flute during quiet moments at calendar signings or shows. It is “without question” the most beautiful flute music I have ever heard. I can close my eyes and still hear him playing.

Read More about Doc @:

Oklahoma Historical Society’s
Encyclopedia of History and Culture

http://digital.library.okstate.edu/encyclopedia/entries/N/NE004.html
JOYCE LEE “DOC” TATE NEVAQUAYA
(1932-1996)

A noted Comanche artist and American Indian flute player Doc Tate Nevaquaya was born to Lean and Victoria Tate Nevaquaya July 3, 1932, in Apache, Oklahoma. Orphaned at fourteen, he resided at the Fort Sill Indian School in Lawton, receiving a high school diploma in 1951. In 1951 and 1952 he attended Haskell Indian Institute in Lawrence, Kansas. A self-taught artist, flutist, composer, dancer, lecturer, and Methodist lay minister, Nevaquaya gave numerous flute and art workshops throughout the United States, including classes at Brigham Young University (1972) and Georgetown University (1974). He made more than twenty-five television appearances, on shows televised nationally and by the British Broadcasting Corporation.

Nevaquaya’s skills in the traditional arts were often featured in national and state observances. The Smithsonian Institution commissioned him to participate in the Comanche Tu-Wee Dance in Washington, D.C. (1970), play the flute on a Goodwill Tour of England (1970), design and paint a Comanche shield to honor the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery (1973), play the flute at the National Folk Festival (1973), and record Comanche Flute Music for Folkways Records (1979). He was commissioned by the Oklahoma Diamond Jubilee to design two coins (1982), and by the Oklahoma Arts Council to compose and perform Flight of the Spirit at Oklahoma State Capitol (1991). He played flute at the Night of the First Americans, held at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. (1982), at the United Nations Mission, New York (1985), at the Codetalkers Decoration Ceremony, Oklahoma State Capitol (1989), and at Carnegie Hall in New York (1990).

Nevaquaya held many memberships. He was a founding member of the American Indian Arts Association, the American Indian Cultural Society, the Oklahoma Indian Mission Arts and Crafts Organization, and Southwestern Indian Arts and Crafts, Inc. He was also a member of the Oklahoma Indian Art League and the University of Oklahoma Board of Visitors (1994).

Among numerous recognitions that came to him were six Grand Awards and the Outstanding Indian Artists Award from Southwestern State College in Weatherford (1969); Indian of the Year award from Oscar Rose Junior College, Midwest City (1975); Outstanding Citizen of Diamond Jubilee Heritage Week from the Apache Chamber of Commerce (1982); the LaDonna Harris Award from Oklahomans for Indian Opportunity (1986); and a National Heritage Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts (1986); and the Artist of the West Award at the American Indian and Cowboy Artists National Western Art Exhibition in San Dimas, California (1994). The Governor’s Arts Award named him an Oklahoma Treasure in 1995.

Nevaquaya married Charlotte Jereaux Foraker, and they had nine children. A Methodist and Democrat, he lived on his family’s land allotment near Apache until his death from a heart attack on March 5, 1996, in Lawton. His sons have carried on his legacy as artists, flute players, and/or dancers.

SEE ALSO: FOLK MUSIC, FOLKLIFE, MUSIC–AMERICAN INDIAN, TRADITIONAL ARTS–AMERICAN INDIAN.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Paula Conlon, “Doc Tate Nevaquaya: Master Comanche Artist and Flute Player” [Manuscript], 2002. Patrick D. Lester, The Biographical Directory of Native American Painters (Tulsa: SIR Publications, 1995). Doc Tate Nevaquaya: In the Realm of the Thirteen Feathers (Oklahoma City: Red Earth, Inc., 2001). Doc Tate Nevaquaya: Portrait of an Oklahoma Treasure (Norman: University of Oklahoma School of Music, Center for Music Television, 2002).

Paula Conlon

© Oklahoma Historical Society

Finer quality gouache painting on artist’s board by Doc Tate Nevaquaya (Comanche, 1932-1996). Doc Tate’s works are usually single figures against an open ground without the landscape detail this piece has. A flautist himself, Tate painted this piece sometime in the 1970’s.

More on Doc:

http://www.cherokeenationindianart.com/Artists/zb_nevaquaya_doc_tate.htm

DOC TATE NEVAQUAYA

Commanche


FUNERAL SERVICES HELD

Funeral services for Doc Tate Nevaquaya, 63, of Apache, were conducted Thursday, March 7, 1996, at 1:00 p.m. at the Ft. Sill Indian School Gymnasium, Lawton, with the Rev. Ronnie Simmons, officiating. A prayer service was held at 7:00 p.m. Wednesday, March 6, at the United Methodist Church of Apache with the Rev. Andy Kamphuis and the Rev. George Montanan, officiating.

Nevaquaya died Tuesday, March 5, 1996, at a Lawton hospital, after suffering a massive heart attack Monday. A full-blooded Comanche, Doc was born July 3, 1932 in Apache, Oklahoma. His parents died eight months apart when he was 13 and he spent his teenage years living with his grandparents, listening to the stories of the tribal elders.

His oldest brother, who was working, assumed the role of a motivating parent. He brought home crayons and a tablet for Doc and encouraged him to draw the nearby Wichita Mountains — something his teachers didn’t approve of. Ironically, at Fort Sill Indian School where Doc was a student, government policies forbidding portrayals of Indian culture was “pagan” had been reversed. Traditional Indian art was then a part of the curriculum, and students were discouraged from pursuing other areas like landscape painting. So Doc avoided taking art classes in school. He wanted to be free from that, to paint what he felt within. Whenever he got a chance, he would sketch the rugged Slick Hills by the farm, complete with rocks and cedars and horses which, for him, were a part of the landscape. At that same time, Doc went out of his way to view all the traditional art that he could, and contributed his own artwork to posters and the school yearbook.

After graduating from high school, he began sketching at home. Doc exhibited and sold his first work at Indian City in Anadarko.

During the 1950s he began to concentrate on painting. After that he became an accomplished painter, winning numerous awards for his work. Art critic Ralph Oliver said his works were “characterized by amazing technical control, exquisite color and a mastery of detail:’

It was also during the 1950s that Doe first became interested in Indian flutes. In the 1960s he began researching the Indian flute in earnest. Because none of the Indian music is written, much of it is lost. Doc researched the flute construction and playing techniques at the Library of Congress and Smithsonian Institution collections and had copies of recordings made in the late 1800s by elders of various tribes. He often listened to them while he painted and based his music on the recordings.

Doc Tate Nevaquaya brought national honor to the state of Oklahoma in 1986, by becoming the first Oklahoman to win the National Heritage Fellowship Award. Given by the National Endowment for the Arts, the award honored Doc as a “flutist and master of traditional arts.” He was equally well-known for his paintings.

The following are credits or accomplishments:


1995—
Was named National Living Treasure, and received award by Gov. Keating; Honorary Cultural Director of the American Indian Cultural Society, Inc., Norman; served on the Board of Directors for the Fine Ants Department at the University of Oklahoma, Norman.


1994 —
Elected to the College of Fine Arts Board of Visitors, University of Oklahoma, Norman; The Doe Tate Nevaquaya Scholarship Fund in the College of Fine Arts was established by American Indian Cultural Society, Inc. through the University of Oklahoma Foundation, Inc. to be available to deserving American Indian students; selected “1994 Artist of the West” by The 18th Annual National Western Art Exhibition and Sale, San Dimas, California.


1993 —
Named “The Honored One” and Parade Marshall for the Red Earth Festival, OKC.

1992 — Ambassador and Parade Marshall for 61st Annual American Indian Exposition, Anadarko; Juried, The Trail of Tears an All Indian Art Competition, Tahlequah; Juried, The Seminole Nation Art Competition, Orlando, Florida; “700 Club”, spoke on behalf of American Indian people.

1991 — Commissioned by the Oklahoma State Arts Council to compose the song “Flight of the Spirit” in honor of the five Native American Ballerinas at the dedication ceremony, Historic Mural Great Rotunda, Oklahoma State Capitol, OKC; Board of Director and founding member of the American Indian Cultural Society, Inc., Norman; Performed at Nevada State Museum, Las Vegas, Nevada.


1990—
Doe was named “A Living Legend” along with six other Indian Artists; performed at Carnegie Hall, New York City, N.Y.

1989 — Doe opened the archery competition of the U.S. Olympic Festival in Norman, with a flute song.

1988— Performed at United Nations Mission, New York City.


1987 —
Doc’s art was listed as Best Investments for 1987.

1986 — The Comanche Tribe of 3klahoma proclaimed the second Friday in October as “Doe Tate Nevaquaya” Day; received the National Endowment Heritage Award for his contribution to the Native American Art forms; received special recognition from Oklahoma State Art Council; Gov. George Nigh; Senator David Boren and a letter from President Ronald Reagan; Master’s Artist Award, Five Civilized Tribes of Oklahoma; Grand Award Winner, Trail of Tears All Indian Art Competition in Tahlequah.

1982— Performed at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. for Night of the First Americans;, with Loretta Lynn, Wayne Newton and Sammy Davis Jr; Listed in the Renowned Artist in the U.S.; Listed in Who’s Who Among American Indians.

1979— Production of an Album of Flute Music, Folklore Music Co., New York City.

1975 — Selected as a famous Oklahoman and name included in the honor list displayed in the Fidelity Bank, OKC; selected by Governor Boren as Artist of the Month, State of Oklahoma; selected by Governor Boren to direct an All Indian Art Show to celebrate Governor’s inauguration; performed with Freddy Fender, Mel Tillis and Roy Clark at the Roy Clark Ranch, Tulsa; Diamond Jubilee Heritage Week Outstanding Citizen, Apache Chamber of Commerce; recipient of the key to the city of Weatherford, along with Astronaut Allen Shepard; artist of a book cover “Komantica” by Harold Keith; lectured in Indian Boarding Schools and Public Schools of Oklahoma.

1970— “On the Road with Charles Kuralt” interviewed for TV Documentary; he was included in a program on British Television and at Expo ‘70 in Japan.

1968-69-70 — Winner of the Grand Award for three consecutive years at the American Indian Exposition, Anadarko.

Nevaquaya’s works are included in the personal collections of Queen Elizabeth II of England and the late actor Vincent Price.

Survivors include his wife, Charlotte, of the home; five sons, Lean of Ft. Worth, Edmond, Timothy, Joseph and Calvert, all of Apache; four daughters, Jereaux Nevaquaya of Apache, Amanda Sue Bordeaux of Rosebud, S.D., Ioycetta Harris of Stroud, and Sonya Reyes of Apache; 17 grandchildren; one great-grandchild; one brother, Bernard Tate Nevaquaya of Indiahoma and one sister, Greta Logan of Shawnee. He was preceded in death by his parents, Lean and Victoria Nevaquaya and two brothers, Malcolm Nevaquaya and Edward Parker.

Burial was in Cache Creek Indian Cemetery under the direction of Crews Funeral Home.

Sample of Doc Tate’s traditional style of painting:

doc-tate-art.jpg

This is an original and treasured artifact from the Nevaquaya family.
It is a petrified skull with Doc’s priceless traditional style art work
featured on the incredible 100 year old Buffalo skull.
Published in: on June 23, 2007 at 9:47 pm  Leave a Comment  

Wealth

I am wealthy when I
touch the earth around me,
when I know my roots,
and when I am grounded
in a culture that nourishes me.

Author Unknown

Published in: on June 11, 2007 at 7:11 pm  Leave a Comment  

1993 Red Earth Festival “Honored One”

Doc Tate Nevaquaya

“Honored One”

Joyce “Doc” Tate Nevaquaya (1932-1996, of the Comanche Tribe), my friend & fellow artist, was named The Honored One at the 1993 Red Earth Festival in Oklahoma City. But during this festival, the passing of his close friend & Comanche brother, George “Woogie” Watchetaker was on his heart & mind. Woogie was on all the hearts & minds of all who knew & loved him. Doc Tate Nevaquaya, Ronnie Harris and I (Cheryl Davis) came together to submit a statement to Red Earth, “a tribute to Woogie,” which included a couple of recommendations.

The letter read as follows:

A Lasting Tribute to the Memory of
George “Woogee” Watchetaker
2/29/16 – 5/27/93

Red Earth will never be the same without the physical presence of Woogee, our beloved “Honored One.”

Woogee was known as a Native American Ambassador world wide. He was a friend, brother, father and grandfather who loved all people, no matter what their race or religion. Woogee gave us all a gift and because the Great Spirit has given us an even greater gift, we will never truly say good-bye.

In honor of Woogee’s contribution to art, dance and his dedicated interest in encouraging our Indian youth to know, practice and pass on their culture, the many friends of Woogee have proposed an award to be presented annually to an entrant in the Red Earth Youth Art Competition which best represents the traditional art styles practiced by Woogie. An additional award is also proposed for a contestant in the Junior Fancy Dance category. These award would be known as the “Woogee Watchetaker Award.”

It is anticipated that the funding for these annual awards would come from the interest on donated funds. If sufficient funding is generated, a scholarship in Woogee’s name is also a possibility.

One of Woogee’s friends has written,

“As you look to the hills and valleys of this land, as
you see the mighty eagle soar, as the smallest wild
flower grows, the spirit of our dear brother lives on.”

It is an honor for us to coordinate this tribute to Woogee, “The Honored One.”

Allie P. Reynolds, Red Earth, President

Signed: /Doc Tate Nevaquaya, Co-Chairman/
Signed: /Cheryl Davis, Co-Chairman/
Signed: /Ronnie Harris, Co-Chairman/

To my knowledge, the proposed awards were never established by Red Earth. A few short years later, Doc passed on. I was told that Doc will once again be honored at Red Earth. I don’t know if this is accurate information, but I thought it appropriate to publish this letter, signed by Doc, which expressed his desire that Red Earth honor his dear brother, Woogie, both formally and annually at the Red Earth festival.

I hope you will be moved to contact Red Earth (http://www.redearth.org/) to propose that the awards indeed be established, in the names of both men, Doc Tate Nevaquaya & George “Woogie” Watchetaker. It seems only fitting that they be honored together by creating these awards that Doc so desired they adopt. These Comanche brothers served together for so many years as Native American Ambassadors to the world… and influenced everyone whose path crossed theirs. Their priceless, long-lasting contributions should forever be honored and passed on to our youth. These awards would be a great way to assure they are remembered & acknowledged every year in a very appropriate way and that they are annually introduced to the next generation of future Native American artists, dancers, lecturers, teachers, composers, musicians, craftsmen & professionals who will shape our future. It will be these young people who will help preserve our rich heritage & history and “what better way is there to show them how one person can have such a positive and profound impact on this world and others.”

Once again, please consider contacting Red Earth to request that the Red Earth Festival officially & permanently establish the “Joyce “Doc” Tate Nevaquaya & George “Woogie” Watchetaker Annual Red Earth Awards” for our youth, in art and dance, in honor of these great men.

To Contact Red Earth:
On the Web: http://www.redearth.org/
Phone: (405) 427-5228
Fax: (405) 427-8079
Address: 2100 N. E. 52nd, OKC, OK USA

Other Interesting Facts About Joyce “Doc” Tate Nevaquaya: His first name, Doc, was given to him by a doctor named Joyce who was a family friend. Nevaquaya means “tired of being pretty” or “tired of being well groomed.” Tate was the name of a white man from Fletcher who was a friend of his grandfather. His grandfather and Fletcher raised cattle together, and in the late 1880’s when the Bureau of Indian Affairs required members of the tribes to give an account of themselves, they needed an English name Tate offered his name to his childhood friend and he accepted that offer.

Doc Tate developed an early appreciation in his youth for the rich history and ceremonies of his people. His desire to preserve the Comanche culture was expressed through his preferred media of water color and tempera. A self-taught artist, he carefully researched and accurately represents the dress and customs of his tribe through his “nearly lost art” of traditional style paintings. (Establishment of the Joyce “Doc” Tate Nevaquaya & George”Woogie” Watchetaker Annual Red Earth Awards (both in art & dance) might just help preserve their traditional style of painting by encouraging our young people to follow in their steps and keep it alive!)

Nevaquaya has received many honors & awards through the years & his work both here in the U.S. and abroad. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Kennedy Center & National Endowment of the Arts recognized & honored him. But he is famous not only as an artist, but as a lecturer, teacher, composer & musician, as well as a flute maker. In 1986 he received the Presidential Award from President Ronald Reagan. Doc Tate also received the Governor’s award for the Diamond Jubilee Coin, ordered in 1982 to go down in the Guinness Book of Records as the first Peyote coin to depict the American Indian church.

For those of you not familiar with the RED EARTH FESTIVAL held in OKLAHOMA CITY, OK: The Red Earth Festival is named in honor of the Oklahoma Indians. In the Choctaw language “red people” means those who share the color of the clay soil.This annual gathering, held in Oklahoma City Fair Park towards the end of May, is the largest in the world, drawing together more than 100 northern and southern Native American tribes for dance competitions and an arts festival. The festivities begin with an electrifying parade through the Fair Park fairgrounds, featuring dancers, drummers and tribal princesses in buckskins, beads and feathers. Visiting families should make sure to see the tot, junior and teen dance performances, and admire the entries in the youth art competition. Other family activities include dramatized storytelling, hands-on crafts, face painting and Native American children’s games.
More on DOC TATE NEVAQUAYA (Commanche)

Funeral services for Doc Tate Nevaquaya, 63, of Apache, were conducted Thursday, March 7, 1996, at 1:00 p.m. at the Ft. Sill Indian School Gymnasium, Lawton, with the Rev. Ronnie Simmons, officiating. A prayer service was held at 7:00 p.m. Wednesday, March 6, at the United Methodist Church of Apache with the Rev. Andy Kamphuis and the Rev. George Montanan, officiating.

Nevaquaya died Tuesday, March 5, 1996, at a Lawton hospital, after suffering a massive heart attack Monday. A full-blooded Comanche, Doc was born July 3, 1932 in Apache, Oklahoma. His parents died eight months apart when he was 13 and he spent his teenage years living with his grandparents, listening to the stories of the tribal elders.

His oldest brother, who was working, assumed the role of a motivating parent. He brought home crayons and a tablet for Doc and encouraged him to draw the nearby Wichita Mountains — something his teachers didn’t approve of. Ironically, at Fort Sill Indian School where Doc was a student, government policies forbidding portrayals of Indian culture was “pagan” had been reversed. Traditional Indian art was then a part of the curriculum, and students were discouraged from pursuing other areas like landscape painting. So Doc avoided taking art classes in school. He wanted to be free from that, to paint what he felt within. Whenever he got a chance, he would sketch the rugged Slick Hills by the farm, complete with rocks and cedars and horses which, for him, were a part of the landscape. At that same time, Doc went out of his way to view all the traditional art that he could, and contributed his own artwork to posters and the school yearbook.

After graduating from high school, he began sketching at home. Doc exhibited and sold his first work at Indian City in Anadarko.

During the 1950s he began to concentrate on painting. After that he became an accomplished painter, winning numerous awards for his work. Art critic Ralph Oliver said his works were “characterized by amazing technical control, exquisite color and a mastery of detail:’

It was also during the 1950s that Doc first became interested in Indian flutes. In the 1960s he began researching the Indian flute in earnest. Because none of the Indian music is written, much of it is lost. Doc researched the flute construction and playing techniques at the Library of Congress and Smithsonian Institution collections and had copies of recordings made in the late 1800s by elders of various tribes. He often listened to them while he painted and based his music on the recordings.

Doc Tate Nevaquaya brought national honor to the state of Oklahoma in 1986, becoming the first Oklahoman to win the National Heritage Fellowship Award. Given by the National Endowment for the Arts, the award honored Doc as a “flutist and master of traditional arts.” He was equally well-known for his paintings.

The following are Doc’s credits or accomplishments:

1995— Was named National Living Treasure, and received award by Gov. Keating; Honorary Cultural Director of the American Indian Cultural Society, Inc., Norman; served on the Board of Directors for the Fine Ants Department at the University of Oklahoma, Norman.

1994 — Elected to the College of Fine Arts Board of Visitors, University of Oklahoma, Norman; The Doe Tate Nevaquaya Scholarship Fund in the College of Fine Arts was established by American Indian Cultural Society, Inc. through the University of Oklahoma Foundation, Inc. to be available to deserving American Indian students; selected “1994 Artist of the West” by The 18th Annual National Western Art Exhibition and Sale, San Dimas, California.

1993 — Named “The Honored One” and Parade Marshall for the Red Earth Festival, OKC.

1992 — Ambassador and Parade Marshall for 61st Annual American Indian Exposition, Anadarko; Juried, The Trail of Tears an All Indian Art Competition, Tahlequah; Juried, The Seminole Nation Art Competition, Orlando, Florida; “700 Club”, spoke on behalf of American Indian people.

1991 — Commissioned by the Oklahoma State Arts Council to compose the song “Flight of the Spirit” in honor of the five Native American Ballerinas at the dedication ceremony, Historic Mural Great Rotunda, Oklahoma State Capitol, OKC; Board of Director and founding member of the American Indian Cultural Society, Inc., Norman; Performed at Nevada State Museum, Las Vegas, Nevada.

1990— Doc was named “A Living Legend” along with six other Indian Artists; performed at Carnegie Hall, New York City, N.Y.

1989 — Doc opened the archery competition of the U.S. Olympic Festival in Norman, with a flute song.

1988— Performed at United Nations Mission, New York City.

1987 — Doc’s art was listed as Best Investments for 1987.

1986 — The Comanche Tribe of 3klahoma proclaimed the second Friday in October as “Doc Tate Nevaquaya” Day; received the National Endowment Heritage Award for his contribution to the Native American Art forms; received special recognition from Oklahoma State Art Council; Gov. George Nigh; Senator David Boren and a letter from President Ronald Reagan; Master’s Artist Award, Five Civilized Tribes of Oklahoma; Grand Award Winner, Trail of Tears All Indian Art Competition in Tahlequah.

1982— Performed at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. for Night of the First Americans;, with Loretta Lynn, Wayne Newton and Sammy Davis Jr; Listed in the Renowned Artist in the U.S.; Listed in Who’s Who Among American Indians.

1979— Production of an Album of Flute Music, Folklore Music Co., New York City.

1975 — Selected as a famous Oklahoman and name included in the honor list displayed in the Fidelity Bank, OKC; selected by Governor Boren as Artist of the Month, State of Oklahoma; selected by Governor Boren to direct an All Indian Art Show to celebrate Governor’s inauguration; performed with Freddy Fender, Mel Tillis and Roy Clark at the Roy Clark Ranch, Tulsa; Diamond Jubilee Heritage Week Outstanding Citizen, Apache Chamber of Commerce; recipient of the key to the city of Weatherford, along with Astronaut Allen Shepard; artist of a book cover “Komantica” by Harold Keith; lectured in Indian Boarding Schools and Public Schools of Oklahoma.

1970— “On the Road with Charles Kuralt” interviewed for TV Documentary; he was included in a program on British Television and at Expo ‘70 in Japan.

1968-69-70 — Winner of the Grand Award for three consecutive years at the American Indian Exposition, Anadarko.

Nevaquaya’s works are included in the personal collections of Queen Elizabeth II of England and the late actor Vincent Price.

Survivors include his wife, Charlotte, of the home; five sons, Lean of Ft. Worth, Edmond, Timothy, Joseph and Calvert, all of Apache; four daughters, Jereaux Nevaquaya of Apache, Amanda Sue Bordeaux of Rosebud, S.D., ioycetta Harris of Stroud, and Sonya Reyes of Apache; 17 grandchildren; one great-grandchild; one brother, Bernard Tate Nevaquaya of Indiahoma and one sister, Greta Logan of Shawnee. He was preceded in death by his parents, Lean and Victoria Nevaquaya and two brothers, Malcolm Nevaquaya and Edward Parker.

Burial was in Cache Creek Indian Cemetery under the direction of Crews Funeral Home.


http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9A00EEDF1F39F935A35750C0A960958260&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=print

nytimes.com

March 6, 1996

New York Times

Doc T. Nevaquaya, Comanche Artist, 63

AP

Doc Tate Nevaquaya, a Comanche artist and flutist who was named an Oklahoma Treasure last fall, died on Tuesday in Comanche County Memorial Hospital in Lawton. He was 63.

The cause was a heart attack, said Mary Pewo, a family friend.

Mr. Nevaquaya was only the second person designated an Oklahoma Treasure, an award that recognized his preservation and sharing of the Comanche Nation’s culture. In his art, he preferred to paint traditional dancers in the traditional style, depicting one-dimensional, highly detailed figures. He and his wife, Charlotte, began working with local missions in the 1960’s and encouraged Indians to improve their craftsmanship and learn the meaning of their designs.

He acquired his first flute in the 1940’s, while a student at the Fort Sill Indian School. Over the years he began to make flutes from cedar and researched Comanche music for the instrument. In 1982, he performed at the Kennedy Center in Washington with Loretta Lynn, Wayne Newton and Sammy Davis Jr. in “A Night of First Americans.”

He released two recordings, “Indian Flute Songs From Comanche Land” and “Comanche Flute Music.”

In addition to his wife, he is survived by five sons and four daughters.

Published in: on June 8, 2007 at 6:09 pm  Leave a Comment  

Oklahoma Capitol With Statue, “As Long As The Waters Flow”

REMEMBERING A MOMENT IN HISTORY

Oklahoma Capitol With Statue,  “As Long As The Waters Flow

Allan Houser’s monumental tribute to Native Americans, As Long As the Waters Flow, was dedicated on June 4, 1989. Among those in attendance was legendary Comanche medicine man George Woogee Watchetaker, traditional Indian flute players Doc Tate Nevaquaya and Woodrow Haney, as well as Governor Henry Bellmon. Watchetaker led a prayer of dedication and conducted a native ritual by use of smoke from burning cedar chips and sage. The traditional elements of the dedication held true to the powerful meaning of legacy within the statue. As Long As the Waters Flow refers to President Andrew Jackson’s vow to Native Americans that they shall posses their land “as long as the grass grows and the rivers run.” The fifteen-foot bronze statue exudes Houser’s artistic style. Lacking intricate representative detailing, the large solid planes among the surface denote strength within an everlasting presence. Her traditional attire is complete with an eagle feather fan, which is considered a sacred symbol among Native American cultures.

aslongasthewaters.jpg

 Allan (far right) at 1989 dedication of “As Long as the Waters Flow” at the Oklahoma State Capitol Building.

Published in: on May 29, 2007 at 6:16 pm  Leave a Comment  

Doc Tate Nevequaya

Hear the Voice, Feel the Music, Experience the Dance

Hear the Voice, Feel the Music, Experience the Dance
by Cheryl Davis 2004

This was created as a tribute to three great men who not only touched my life but continue to touch the lives of many others through their works, words, and gifts.

Center

George “Woogie” Watchetaker

2/29/1916 – 5/27/1993 Comanche

Left

Jerome Bushyhead

(Coyote Walks By)

9/12/1929 – 4/15/2000 Cheyenne

Right

Joyce Lee “Doc” Tate Nevaquaya

7/3/1932 – 3/5/1996 Comanche

Woogie” was known as a spiritual leader, world champion dancer, rainmaker and artist. He danced before Congress, Presidents Roosevelt, President Truman and the Queen. He had a unique style, impacting all who saw him dance. His art told the “old stories.”

Jerome” touched our world as a lecturer, a radio and television producer/host and director of the State Fair Indian Program. As “a voice” for Native Americans, he helped to fight for feather rights in 1974. His gift of painting was nationally recognized.

Doc” blessed our world with his flute music, paintings, dance, lectures and prayers. Declared an Oklahoma and National Treasure, Doc gave much to help others. His music and art touched the soul. In 1970 Doc and Woogie danced before the Queen of England.

They were always ready to share themselves with “all” people. Their spirits live on and their examples remind us to always be giving of ourselves. If you were blessed to know them, please share your special memories of them, so they can continue to bless others as they remain in our hearts and bless us.

More Stories Posted Soon!

Published in: on May 25, 2007 at 5:37 am  Comments (2)